The Baigong Pipes: China’s 150,000 Year Old Iron Pipes

According to mainstream historians, the Iron Age marks the time that mankind first started working with iron. Iron was the obvious progression from the Bronze Age, and modern archeologists say that the Iron Age began around 1,200 BCE. That is a little over 3,000 years ago.

baigong-pipes-locationIn China, in the Qinghai Province near Mount Baigong, mainstream historians believe that the first nomadic people showed up about 30,000 years ago. If you are keeping track, these people should be Neolithic, or stone age, people. They would have had no knowledge of metallurgy.

The problem with these accepted theories of the historical progression of things comes from a recent find in the area. A pyramid structure, three caves with triangle shaped openings, and iron pipes of different diameters were first discovered in the region in 1996. The iron pipes went from the pyramid to a salt water lake. The pipes are mostly found in one of the pyramid shaped caves on the front of the 180 ft high pyramid. The 2 other pyramid shaped caves have collapsed, and have not been explored. Other pipes have been found on the shore of the salt water lake with some pipes running into the lake. So does that mean the stone age people were using iron? Not exactly. You see, these pipes have been dated to be 150,000 years old.

The Baigong Pipes are How Old?

Let’s go over that again, that is 120,000 years before anyone was supposed to have been in the area, and 146,800 years before anybody was supposed to have been working with Iron. Most archeologists agree that the first modern humans to venture into Asia did so along the coast around 70,000 years ago. That is 80,000 after these iron pipes were made. In an interesting side note to this, the New York Times states that “most scientists think that people who look like us — anatomically modern Homo sapiens — evolved by at least 130,000 years ago”. That would be 20,000 years after someone built this pyramid with iron pipes.

baigong-pipes-caveIn 2002, the Chinese government sent scientists to investigate the site. Qin Jianwen, the head of publicity for the local Delingha government, told reporters that the pipes were analyzed at a local smeltery and 8 percent of the material could not be identified. The remaining material was a combination of ferric oxide, silicon dioxide, and calcium oxide, which are byproducts of a long interaction between iron and the surrounding sandstone. Samples brought back to the Beijing Institute of Geology were examined by thermoluminescence dating, a technique that can determine how long it’s been since a crystalline mineral was either heated or exposed to sunlight. The result came back that if these were indeed iron pipes that had been smelted, they were made 140-150,000 years ago. In 2007, some of the pipes where determined to also be radioactive.

Theories about the origin of these pipes range. Some think that it was aliens. Others think it was an early human civilization who’s technology was lost to later generations. Still others think that they may be from a group of human-ish primates that evolved separately to us, and then died off. There are even some mainstream scientists that try to write the whole thing off by claiming that the pipes are some sort of fossilized trees, and the pyramid is a natural formation.

I think that these pipes are evidence that the history we grew up believing may not be the whole truth. As I mentioned earlier in this article, Mainstream science believes that modern humans have been around for 130,000 years. However, all of civilization has been created in the past 7,000 years. So what were we doing for the first 123,000 years? It is more logical to assume that people have created civilization, grew, and advanced, and then lost it all due to man made or natural disasters (Toba Supervolcano?). If each Incarnation of civilization lasted 7,000 years, we could have done it 17 times already.

 

2 Comments
  1. Reply DC October 3, 2015 at 10:58 pm

    Let’s let Baigongs be Baigongs!

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